Evangelicals and Catholics increasingly find ways to collaborate

Evangelical Leaders Survey Shows Strong Support for Cooperation

Evangelicals and Catholics have their theological differences, but increasingly these religious groups are joining forces and working together.

Pastor Andy Gray of member church, the Urban Refuge, speaking at Catholic-evangelical press conference calling for immigration reform
Pastor Andy Gray of member church, the Urban Refuge, speaking at Catholic-evangelical press conference calling for immigration reform.

U.S. evangelical leaders unanimously agree that teaming up with Catholics on issues of mutual concern is important, according to a recent Evangelical Leaders Survey put out by the National Association of Evangelicals (NAE).

“We have more values and beliefs in common with Catholic leaders than with liberal Protestant leaders who question biblical authority or the saving work of Christ,” said Carl Nelson, president of Transform Minnesota, via a media release from the NAE. “While there are clear doctrinal differences between evangelicals and Catholics, increasingly I find a kindred spirit in the need to proclaim the gospel of Jesus, an appreciation for the Bible as the guide for life and faith, and our common values surrounding the sanctity of life, religious freedom and biblical marriage.”

Increasingly I find a kindred spirit in the need to proclaim the gospel of Jesus, an appreciation for the Bible as the guide for life and faith, and our common values surrounding the sanctity of life, religious freedom and biblical marriage.

Catholics and evangelicals have found common ground on issues such as marriage, the sanctity of life and religious freedom. Leaders are looking past differences and recognizing the importance of collaborating. Evangelicals and Catholics can accomplish more together than they can accomplish separately.

“We have to build greater collaboration between Catholics and evangelicals for the common good,” said Johnnie Moore, senior vice president of Liberty University in Lynchburg, VA, via the release. “Im optimistic about this type of engagement among millennials, because we are less inclined toward the denominational silos that have often stood as impenetrable barriers for collaboration.”

As an example of local Catholic and evangelical cooperation, in 2013 Transform Minnesota and the Minnesota Catholic Conference released “A Christian Call for Immigration Reform,” a document signed by more than 100 local Catholic and evangelical leaders. These two organizations also partnered with the Minnesota Family Council and the Alliance Defending Freedom again in 2013 to present the Minnesota Religious Freedom Forum.

“Catholics can still be Catholics, and evangelicals can still be evangelicals while we leverage our common concerns and beliefs,” said Leith Anderson, president of the NAE.


June 4, 2014

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