NAE files brief in contraception mandate case

Impact of case has far-reaching consequences

The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) recently filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in support of two organizations that have objections over the administration’s insurance mandate, which requires employers to offer contraception coverage in their plans.

Society insists that we demonstrate a moral consciousness in regards to a corporation’s environmental impact, living wages and fair trade policies. Why should that expectation be different when it comes to an organization’s moral consciousness about matters of human life?

The two organizations—Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Woods—say covering contraception violates their religious beliefs, according to a news release from the NAE.

“This case is important, historic and precedent setting,” said Leith Anderson, NAE president and former senior pastor of Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, via the release. “The ruling will have vast implications on what the government can mandate business owners to do. The government does not have the right to violate the religious beliefs of any of its citizens, including business owners.”

Hobby Lobby storefrontThe contraception mandate has been at the center of debate for religious organizations and business owners who are uncomfortable offering contraception coverage in their insurance plans. The administration, despite intense lobbying efforts, has been unwilling to ease the mandate for business owners, although it provided churches with an exemption.

“This issue is critical for a number of reasons,” said Carl Nelson, president and CEO of Transform Minnesota. “The most important reason being that business owners in the U.S. should not have to violate their religious beliefs in order to do business. The impact of this mandate, unless it’s reversed, will have far-reaching consequences down the road.”

Nelson continued that society insists that we demonstrate a moral consciousness in regards to a corporation’s environmental impact, living wages and fair trade policies. Why should that expectation be different when it comes to an organization’s moral consciousness about matters of human life?

Last fall, Transform Minnesota—along with several other organizations—sponsored the Minnesota Religious Freedom Forum, where leaders from Hobby Lobby talked about the faith foundation of their organization, and attendees learned first-hand about laws and regulations impacting businesses and organizations in Minnesota.

For more information on this conference, visit www.mnreligiousfreedom.org.


February 10, 2014

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